Vintage Tumblr Themes

synapse-heart said: beverly until i was five, ipswich until i was thirteen, now concord.

Did the tornado hit you guys badly over there? I live in Revere

Tree fell on my house. If you live in Massachusetts and watch the news, you’ve probably already seen me and my family all over it. All before 12:30, what a day.

whitebeyonce:

the scary thing about dating is that you are either going to marry that person or break up

aquariantides:

adulthood is just an endless stream of phone calls you don’t want to make but have to

vengeanceandrevenge:

fuckyeah-nerdery:

That last gif, though.

Julia Gillard is actually my favourite ever.

maghrabiyya:

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

after constantly being made fun of for being “overly politically correct” by my own family members, i needed to see this again

maghrabiyya:

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

after constantly being made fun of for being “overly politically correct” by my own family members, i needed to see this again

maliciousmelons:

if you like it then you shoulda put a ring on it

image

Reblog and see if you get a color.

  • PURPLE: We near never speak, but I do enjoy your presence on my dashboard.
  • FUCHSIA: I wish I could become your best friend through the internet.
  • GREY: You leave me with jumbled words.
  • RED: I'm in love with you.
  • PINK: I have a crush on you.
  • TURQUOISE: You're hot.
  • CHARTREUSE: I sincerely wish you would notice me.
  • TEAL: We have quite a lot in common.
  • BLUE: You are my Tumblr crush.
  • ORANGE: I dislike your page.
  • YELLOW: WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO ME.
  • WHITE: PLEASE MARRY ME.
  • GREEN: I find you cute.
  • BLACK: I would date you.
  • BROWN: I dislike you.